Jalan Kartika Plaza No.90, Kuta, Badung Regency, Bali, Indonesia

Cholera

Our clinic is located in the heart of the Kuta area and is within the reach of the tourist areas of Seminyak and Nusa Dua.

2019-04-25
Tropical Diseases

Cholera

by Dhani Anggara, MD

CHOLERA

 

Cholera is a bacterial disease usually spread through contaminated water. Cholera causes severe diarrhea and dehydration. Left untreated, cholera can be fatal in a matter of hours, even in previously healthy people. A bacterium called Vibrio cholerae causes cholera infection. Contaminated water supplies are the main source of cholera infection, although raw shellfish, uncooked fruits and vegetables, and other foods also can harbor V. cholerae.

Symptom

Symptoms of cholera infection may include:

  • Diarrhea

Cholera-related diarrhea comes on suddenly and may quickly cause dangerous fluid loss — as much as a quart (about 1 liter) an hour. Diarrhea due to cholera often has a pale, milky appearance that resembles water in which rice has been rinsed (rice-water stool).

  • Nausea and vomiting

Occurring especially in the early stages of cholera, vomiting may persist for hours at a time.

  • Dehydration

Dehydration can develop within hours after the onset of cholera symptoms. Depending on how many body fluids have been lost, dehydration can range from mild to severe. A loss of 10 percent or more of total body weight indicates severe dehydration.

  • Electrolyte imbalance

An electrolyte imbalance can lead to serious signs and symptoms such as:

  • Muscle cramps

These result from the rapid loss of salts such as sodium, chloride and potassium.

  • Shock

This is one of the most serious complications of dehydration. It occurs when low blood volume causes a drop in blood pressure and a drop in the amount of oxygen in your body. If untreated, severe hypovolemic shock can cause death in a matter of minutes.

 

 

 

 

Diagnosis

A doctor may suspect cholera if a patient has severe watery diarrhea, vomiting, and rapid dehydration, especially if they have recently traveled to a place that has a recent history of cholera, or poor sanitation, or if they have recently consumed shellfish.

A stool sample will be sent to a laboratory for testing, but if cholera is suspected, the patient must begin treatment even before the results come back.

 

Treatment

Cholera requires immediate treatment because the disease can cause death within hours.

  • Rehydration

The goal is to replace lost fluids and electrolytes using a simple rehydration solution, oral rehydration salts (ORS). The ORS solution is available as a powder that can be reconstituted in boiled or bottled water. Without rehydration, approximately half the people with cholera die. With treatment, the number of fatalities drops to less than 1 percent.

  • Intravenous fluids

During a cholera epidemic, most people can be helped by oral rehydration alone, but severely dehydrated people may also need intravenous fluids.

  • Antibiotics

While antibiotics are not a necessary part of cholera treatment, some of these drugs may reduce both the amount and duration of cholera-related diarrhea for people who are severely ill.

  • Zinc supplements

Research has shown that zinc may decrease and shorten the duration of diarrhea in children with cholera.

Source

The most common sources of cholera infection are standing water and certain types of food, including seafood, raw fruits and vegetables, and grains.

  • Surface or well water

Cholera bacteria can lie dormant in water for long periods, and contaminated public wells are frequent sources of large-scale cholera outbreaks. People living in crowded conditions without adequate sanitation are especially at risk of cholera.

  • Seafood

Eating raw or undercooked seafood, especially shellfish that originates from certain locations can expose you to cholera bacteria. Most recent cases of cholera occurring in the United States have been traced to seafood from the Gulf of Mexico.

  • Raw fruits and vegetables

Raw, unpeeled fruits and vegetables are a frequent source of cholera infection in areas where cholera is endemic. In developing nations, uncomposted manure fertilizers or irrigation water containing raw sewage can contaminate produce in the field.

  • Grains

In regions where cholera is widespread, grains such as rice and millet that are contaminated after cooking and allowed to remain at room temperature for several hours become a medium for the growth of cholera bacteria.

 

Prevention

If you're traveling to cholera-endemic areas, your risk of contracting the disease is extremely low if you follow these precautions:

  • Wash hands with soap and water frequently,especially after using the toilet and before handling food. Rub soapy, wet hands together for at least 15 seconds before rinsing. If soap and water aren't available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Drink only safe water, including bottled water or water you've boiled or disinfected yourself. Use bottled water even to brush your teeth. Hot beverages are generally safe, as are canned or bottled drinks, but wipe the outside before you open them. Avoid adding ice to your beverages unless you made it yourself using safe water.
  • Eat food that's completely cooked and hot and avoid street vendor food, if possible. If you do buy a meal from a street vendor, make sure it's cooked in your presence and served hot.
  • Avoid sushi, as well as raw or improperly cooked fish and seafood of any kind.
  • Stick to fruits and vegetables that you can peel yourself, such as bananas, oranges and avocados. Stay away from salads and fruits that can't be peeled, such as grapes and berries.
  • Be wary of dairy foods, including ice cream, which is often contaminated, and unpasteurized milk.

 

Souce:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cholera/symptoms-causes/syc-20355287

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/189269.php

https://medlineplus.gov/cholera.html

 

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